Dijon Dajee 🇬🇧

Dijon Dajee
Oil and acrylic on canvas
50 x 50 cm
Dijon Dajee
Oil on Canvas
65 x 90 cm
Dijon Dajee

Acrylic on Canvas

70 x 100 cm

Dijon Dajee

Oil on canvas

100 x 120 cm

Dijon Dajee

Acrylic on canvas

40 x 60 cm

Dijon Dajee

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 90 cm

Dijon Dajee

Oil on canvas

50 x 70 cm

Dijon Dajee

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Dijon Dajee (b.1984) was born and raised in London. With an Indian, British and New Zealand heritage his work is similarly international, spanning influences from all areas of the globe.

Gaining his Master’s degree in Philosophy in 2008, he taught himself to paint in order to create a meditative space whilst studying.

In 2012 he started exhibiting and has since been shown at the Royal College of Art, Central St. Martins and the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. Dajee’s work is informed by academic aesthetics, often using The British Journal of Aesthetics as a primary source material in the early stages of their creation. In direct response to C. J. Ducasse, who believed that “the artist’s business is to practice art, and not to talk about it”.

Dajee’s work leans into his academic background, allowing for a dialogue to be played out between the viewer and the work. His works are founded on complex ideas but are executed in minimalist ways exploring the deep connection between the rational and the intuitive mind. The subject of his work ranges from technical themes in astrophysics to specific interpretations of Aristotelian metaphysics, rewarding the viewer who wishes to consider these ideas further whilst at the same time creating a meditative and calm visual language.

 

Statement

The title of this series of works comes from Aristotle’s notion that every physical object is a compound of matter and form. Known as “hylomorphism”, a portmanteau of the Greek words for matter (hulê) and form (morphê).

The works bring sculptural forms and texture into the painted image, centered around the project of describing the world around us.

Focussing on slow, meditative brushstrokes and undiluted pigments, the images emerge from the mottled ground of the painting in pure forms.

They invite the viewer to look out beyond the surface of the canvas to the world in which they inhabit reminding us that world is composed of these forms, far more than we care to admit. As humans we naturally think in logarithmic scales and instinctively understand the mathematical principles lying within everything we see.

The works bring us back to rediscover these basic elements of the human mind.