Jamie Shaw 🇬🇧

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic on canvas
50 x 40 cm

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic on canvas
50 x 40 cm

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic, emulsion, spray paint and ink on canvas
150 x 120 cm

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic, emulsion, spray paint and ink on canvas
150 x 120 cm

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic, emulsion, spray paint and ink on canvas
100 x 70 cm

Jamie Shaw

Acrylic, emulsion, spray paint and ink on canvas
100 x 70 cm

Jamie Shaw

ABOUT THE ARTIST

I was born in London, in 1986, and grew up in several cities across the south of UK, in my adult life I have moved from Brighton, London and Bristol, and I’m now living in the North East of England.

Despite an early interest in visuals arts I did not feel well suited to academic education in Fine Art and after trying a few other subjects, resolved to learn and develop my skills as an artist through sheer practice. This quickly led to an active output, taking part in fairs, group and solo exhibitions and collaborations across the country, and took me from Brighton to to a vibrant live/work warehouse community in East London and then on to Bristol.

I am now based in the North East and continuing my ever evolving journey as an abstract painter alongside my career as a motion graphics artist, with a specialism in performance visuals and projection mapping. I am also exploring the intersections of my painting practice and these parallel digital skills.

Statement

Spatial structure, emptiness, patterns and forms are drawn out of initially chaotic processes, and go through multiple cycles of reconfiguration, often with the surface being reoriented during the process. These overlapping, nearly stable elements exist in a tension between total obscurity and definitive representation. For me this echoes the natural world, where things exist in multiple potential states of creation and decay.

The patterns that occur through material interactions, and as a result of the way in which materials are applied to the surface, bring to light aerial views of other-worldly landscapes, polarising the imaginary scale against the actual distance from the canvas and inviting the viewer to take a closer look. The memory of places, and the alterations of memory influenced by emotional states and the flux of awareness and attention, all contribute to the reconfiguration processes in developing compositions.